Posts Tagged ‘hope’

Real Men Eat Cupcakes

Wednesday, May 16th, 2018
Sweet
Indulgence
A
Charleston Harbor Novel Book 1
by
Debbie White
Genre:
Sweet Romance
 
Real
Men Eat Cupcakes

 

 

Annie
McPherson has had it with all the blind dates her grandmother and
auntie set her up with. She just wants to be left alone to run the
Sweet Indulgence cupcake bakery – even if it means she’ll remain
single forever.

 

Jack’s
just been through a gut-wrenching break-up, and women are the last
thing on his mind. Now he’s on a mission to pick up cupcakes for
his niece’s birthday party—not a mission to fall in love. Pulled
in by Annie’s good looks and witty charm, though, temptation proves
too sweet.

 

But
will Annie’s pesky grandmother and auntie welcome Jack as Annie’s
choice or will they have him jumping through hoops to prove he’s
the one?

 

Fans
of Debbie Macomber, Sherryl Woods, and Susan Wiggs are sure to love
Sweet Indulgence, the first sweet romance novel in the Charleston
Harbor series.

 

This
book is too sweet to pass up!

 

**Only
.99 cents!!**
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to Goodreads
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Sweet
Magnolia
A Charleston Harbor
Novel Book 2
 
What
doesn’t divide us makes us stronger. 

 

 

While
on their honeymoon, Annie and Jack are called back to Charleston,
cutting their trip short. But no matter what the disaster, nothing
can deter this dynamic duo from moving forward with their plans to
build their dream home, Sweet Magnolia on Kiawah Island.

 

 

 

 

 

This
is book two of the Charleston Harbor Novels set in historic
Charleston, South Carolina where sweet tea and love for family
prevail and is the balm that soothes the heart. Follow along in the
series as the Powells and McPhersons live life to the fullest while
overcoming many hardships, making them stronger, and bringing them
closer than ever.

 

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to Goodreads
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Sweet
Carolina
A Charleston Harbor
Novel Book 3
 
When
a hurricane threatens to wreak havoc on the South Carolina coast,
Annie prepares Sweet Magnolia for what she thinks will be a day or
two without electricity while Jack checks on Lady Powell down at the
dock. But when Jack doesn’t return promptly, Annie becomes
concerned.

 

Mary makes an announcement
that makes her the center of attention, but Annie has a bit of news
causing them to share the limelight. 

 

Annie
is having second thoughts about running the Sweet Indulgence. Is she
just feeling the pressure of motherhood or could this be the end of
the cupcakery she started from the ground up?

 

Sweet
Carolina, the final installment of the Charleston Harbor Novels
promises to be an uplifting clean and sweet contemporary women’s
fiction laced with a romantic thread, where honor, family, love, and
hope always prevail.

 

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Debbie
is a USA Today Bestselling Author. She currently lives in northern
California where the hills are dotted with vineyards and the jagged
coastline is nearby. Many of her books describe the beautiful area
she calls home. She avidly supports animal rescue by donating a
percentage of all book sales to rescue groups nationwide! Now here
are a few more interesting tidbits of information about her!

 

 

1.
Her spouse served in the U.S. Air Force for over 20 years. She uses
some of her experiences as a military wife in some of her
stories.

 

 

2.
She has two granddaughters and a grandson.

 

 

3.
She received her degree in Sociology in 2011 and graduated Magna Cum
Laude.

 

 

4.
She hasn’t always dreamed of writing, but she’s always loved reading
and decided she’d give it a try. Her fans love her so much, she’s
still putting out books three years later.

 

 

5.
Her very first book, The Salty Dog was an Amazon Best-seller. 

 

 

6.
You can follow all the latest news about releases, book signings and
more on her website
http://www.authordebbiewhite.com

 

Website
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Pinterest
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* Amazon
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the tour HERE
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Is it possible to survive the loss of a child?

Sunday, August 13th, 2017
After the Flowers Die: A Handbook of Heartache, Hope and Healing After Losing a child by Author Melanie Delorme
“Is it possible to survive the loss of a child?

 

Even though you might be feeling that the answer to this question is no, never, absolutely not; be assured that not only is it possible for you to survive, but you are also strong enough to thrive after this devastating tragedy.
The loss of a child creates a gaping hole in a parent’s heart that seems unbearable and the only people who truly understand your pain are other bereaved parents. Melanie is one of those parents and, in After the Flowers Die, she offers encouragement, hope and honest suggestions for how you can once again experience joy. 
This book is written in an easy to read A to Z format and covers topics that many parents may experience, such as anger, bitterness, birthdays, Christmas, hope, signs, and more. If you have lost a child and are feeling hurt and lost, this book is a great starting point for you to acknowledge your loss, celebrate your child’s life and find hope.
Are you ready to begin your journey towards healing?”

 

 

Amazon ~ Amazon UK ~ 

Amazon Canada ~ Amazon Australia ~

 
 

Melanie Delorme was a content English teacher, wife, mother, sister and
friend when without warning she gained the title of bereaved parent when her
eight-year-old son Garrett was accidentally killed in a hunting accident. Her
road to healing brought her to write her first book. Melanie is involved with
her local chapter of Compassionate Friends and is passionate about offering
hope to other bereaved parents. She is currently living on a ranch in Southern
Saskatchewan with her husband, Gerry, and their two children. 




Connect with the Author here: 

~ Website ~

Excerpt

Acceptance•Addictiong ‘Anger•Annivergary•

ACCEPTANCE

I know what you might be thinking. What?! Accept this?! How dare you even suggest that Ijust accept the death of my child! Before you get angry, hear me out.

I know this is not how life is supposed to work—children should never die before their parents. My grandmother is 95 years old, and she and I had this conversation when Garrett died at age 8 and again when her son, my uncle, died at 58.

When grief experts discuss the stages of grief, acceptance often comes last. I’d like to propose that it should be first, middle, and last. The acceptance of your child’s death allows you to move through the other stages. It allows you to take ownership of your feelings and move towards healing.

It seems fitting that acceptance begins this alphabetized glossary, for without acceptance there can be no healing, no remembering, and no moving forward.

Acceptance does not mean you are over it, nor does it mean that you know how you will live with it, and it certainly does not mean that you will forget your child.

Acceptance means that, as heartbreaking as it is, you know that you cannot bring your child back. However, you will continue to search for ways to keep your child alive through positive actions and celebrations.

Acceptance is the conscious choice of realizing that your relationship with your child has not ended; it has merely changed. It has changed from physically spending time together to mentally, emotionally, and spiritually spending the rest of your life on earth together.

You will likely accept your child’s death with your head far sooner than you accept it with your heart, and that’s okay. I know my head accepted Garrett’s death a long time ago, but a few months back while setting the table for supper, I absentmindedly took five plates out of the cupboard. My heart needed a gentle reminder of our loss because it obviously wasn’t so sure about this acceptance thing.

Your heart may need some gentle reminders too. Be kind and patient with yourself as you search for this place of acceptance.

ADDICTIONS

No one sets a goal to become an addict. So often, addictions begin innocently but then slowly turn into habits that become uncontrollable.

I am not a medical professional, so perhaps I am not qualified to speak about addiction, though I am still going to offer my opinion. It has been my experience that many

addicts are trying to escape undesirable feelings. These feelings may be stress, anger, grief, or loneliness. It appears that it is not necessarily the substance or the behavior that is addictive, but more the ability to escape.

The idea that something could take away your unwanted emotions—albeit temporarily—is very tempting. Certain addictions allow us to detach from our emotions and feel carefree—briefly. Unfortunately, when the effects of the addiction wear off, our emotional pain returns, often worse than it was before.

Be mindful of your alcohol consumption, legal or illegal drug use, eating, exercising, gambling, and internet usage. If any of your behaviors start to make you feel out of control, you may want to consider seeking professional help.

ANGER

Perhaps you think that anger should be higher on the list than acceptance. Perhaps you have seen the supposed stages of grief somewhere, and you already know that anger is one of them. Possibly that is the stage you are in at this minute.

I remember seeing other parents ignore their children because they were on their phones, and I was so angry that I wanted to scream at them, How dare you not appreciate the life ofyour child. But then I remembered that I had not been a perfect parent either.

There were other times that I wanted to scream at my friends, Hello?! Have youforgotten me? How dare you get back to your normal life like nothing has changedfor you? But the reality was, nothing did change for many of them. It didn’t mean that they weren’t still thinking about me, and it didn’t mean that they would not offer support if I asked.

*See also FRIENDS

Anger is such a dangerous emotion to embrace, and even though it does not rear its head without cause, too often we forget that we have the power to control it. Every time I wanted to scream at someone, it was warranted—in my mind. However, what would it have gained me? Would it have made me feel better? Maybe for a minute. But unless it brought my son back, it would not have made me truly happy, and to be the source of another person’s hurt was not going to make me feel better.

I know a mother whose child was Idned by a reckless driver who failed to stop at a stop sign. This mother spent three years living in a state of rage. She attended every court hearing the driver faced, insisting that he be jailed for life. She wrote letters to her government officials demanding that he never receive bail, and she spoke of nothing else. The courts deemed this particular accident to be just that—an accident, and the man spent no time in jail. We can all understand her outrage, but having that man spend the rest of his life in jail was not going to take away her agony; it was not going to bring her daughter back. Furthermore, that man was also going to spend the rest of his life hurting and coping with his guilt.

Anger becomes dangerous when we choose to take this emotion with us on our daily journey. The bottom line is this: the more time you spend angry, the less time you will spend grieving and the further away it will take you from your memories and the further away you will be from acceptance.

So why isn’t anger higher on the list than acceptance? Well obviously, because my book would no longer be alphabetical. But seriously, accept that you may be angry. Allow yourself to be angry—temporarily. It will be the acceptance of your anger that will allow you to deal with it in a healthy or even practical manner. Consider taking some action to alleviate your anger. Throw something. Punch something. Scream in your car. Cry in your bedroom. Perhaps one of these will make you feel better, or perhaps you need a bigger outlet for your anger.

Have you ever heard of Candy Lightner? She was so outraged when her daughter, Cari, was killed by a drunk driver in 1980 that she organized Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). I It doesn’t get much more practical than that! I’m not saying you need to become the founder of a new organization, but perhaps you can join an existing one or simply share your anger with others who have had similar experiences.

*See also SUPPORT GROUPS

I know it is difficult to hear and even more difficult to accomplish, but for your own wellbeing, you need to let go of anger as quickly as you can.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.

—Buddha2

 

To view our blog schedule and follow along with this tour visit our Official Event page 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway



Hosted by:

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Is it possible to survive the loss of a child?

Wednesday, July 12th, 2017

Melanie Delorme was a content English teacher, wife, mother, sister and friend when without warning she gained the title of bereaved parent when her eight-year-old son Garrett was accidentally killed in a hunting accident. Her road to healing brought her to write her first book. Melanie is involved with
her local chapter of Compassionate Friends and is passionate about offering hope to other bereaved parents. She is currently living on a ranch in Southern Saskatchewan with her husband, Gerry, and their two children. 




Connect with the Author here: 

~ Website ~

After the Flowers Die: A Handbook of Heartache, Hope and Healing After Losing a child by Author Melanie Delorme
“Is it possible to survive the loss of a child?

 

Even though
you might be feeling that the answer to this question is no, never, absolutely not; be assured that not only is it possible for you to survive, but you are also strong enough to thrive after this devastating tragedy.
The loss of a child creates a gaping hole in a parent’s heart that seems unbearable and the
only people who truly understand your pain are other bereaved parents. Melanie
is one of those parents and, in After the Flowers Die, she offers encouragement, hope and honest suggestions for how you can once again experience joy. 
This book is written in an easy to read A to Z format and covers topics that many parents
may experience, such as anger, bitterness, birthdays, Christmas, hope, signs,
and more. If you have lost a child and are feeling hurt and lost, this book is
a great starting point for you to acknowledge your loss, celebrate your child’s
life and find hope.
Are you ready to begin your journey towards healing?”

 

 

~ Amazon ~ Amazon UK
~ Amazon Canada ~ Amazon Australia ~
Snippet:
Anger is such a dangerous emotion to embrace, and even though it does not rear its head without cause, too often we forget that we have the power to control it.
Every time I wanted to scream at someone, it was warranted—in my mind. However, what would it have gained me? Would it have made me feel better? Maybe for a minute. But unless it brought my son back, it would not have made me truly happy, and to be the source of another person’s hurt was not going to make me feel better.
I know a mother whose child was Idned by a reckless driver
who failed to stop at a stop sign. This mother spent three years living in a
state of rage. She attended every court hearing the driver faced, insisting
that he be jailed for life. She wrote letters to her government officials
demanding that he never receive bail, and she spoke of nothing else. The courts
deemed this particular accident to be just that—an accident, and the man spent
no time in jail. We can all understand her outrage, but having that man spend
the rest of his life in jail was not going to take away her agony; it was not
going to bring her daughter back. Furthermore, that man was also going to spend
the rest of his life hurting and coping with his guilt.
Anger becomes dangerous when we choose to take this emotion
with us on our daily journey. The bottom line is this: the more time you spend
angry, the less time you will spend grieving and the further away it will take
you from your memories and the further away you will be from acceptance.
So why isn’t anger higher on the list than acceptance? Well obviously, because my book would no longer be alphabetical. But seriously, accept that you may be angry. Allow yourself to be angry—temporarily. It will be the acceptance of your anger that will allow you to deal with it in a healthy or even practical manner. Consider taking some action to alleviate your anger. Throw something. Punch something. Scream in your car. Cry in your bedroom. Perhaps one of these will make you feel better, or perhaps you need a bigger outlet for your anger.
 Have you ever heard of Candy Lightner? She was so outraged when her daughter, Cari, was killed by a drunk driver in 1980 that
she organized Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). I It doesn’t get
much more practical than that! I’m not saying you need to become the founder of
a new organization, but perhaps you can join an existing one or simply share
your anger with others who have had similar experiences.
 
To view our blog schedule and follow along with this tour visit our Official Event page 

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Hosted By

 

Meet My Character blog hop

Monday, August 25th, 2014

I was invited to this “Meet My Character blog hop” by Carol Anne Olsen Malone

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Her Bio:

Carol’s bio: Carol Malone has found a magical key for successfully combining her three passions – romance, sports, and writing in her highly rated book, “Fight Card Romance: Ladies Night.” http://amzn.to/1kI4dVo With “Ladies Night,” she became the first woman to punch her way into the suspenseful, male-dominated genre of pulp boxing with a tender love story. Since then she has written numerous stories to entice readers to scramble into a front row seat for a power-packed thrill-ride of romance and sports action.

Look for her novella “Hot Corner Magic” to be published in a pulp sports anthology in the next month or two and a Christmas visit to “Ladies Night” at Christmas time.

If not hammering out new tales, Carol is reading, watching sports or the Food Network on TV, or hanging with her sci-fi author husband on the Coast of California. Come visit her website and chat with her about sports and amour.

Website: http://carolmalone.net/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carolmaloneauthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarolAnneMalone

Her character blog hop link is: http://carolmalone.net/?p=903

 

My Character’s Interview: 

1) Anna what is the name of your character? Is he/she fictional or a historic person? (more…)

How to endure tragedy with artist Lori Nawyn (for children)

Saturday, September 7th, 2013

Love, hope, hugs When Scary Things happens by Christy Monson and artist Lori Nawyn is an excellent  book that helps adults to help children to overcome tragedies. A 5 star review book.

LHH Small

Lori, where were you born and where do you live now?

I was born in Northern Utah and currently reside there. I’ve also lived in Idaho.

I have lived all my live in Utah. When did you first know you wanted to be an artist?

When I was in fifth grade, I first began to dream of writing and illustrating books. It was much later that I finally got the confidence to try both.

How neat…Do you have a drawing routine?

Unfortunately not. I love illustration, but I’m also an author with several new books due out (Fill Your Day With Hope, Covenant, August 2013; Peachy: A Harvest of Fruity Goodness, Familius, September 2013; A Year’s Journey, Covenant, January 2014; The Great American Family Reunion Cookbook, Familius, March 2014). With edits and promotion efforts, I don’t have nearly as much time to spend on my art as I’d like. (more…)

Love, Hugs and Hope When Scary Things Happen a review

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

***** stars for this great book.

LHH Small

There are not many books that show adults how to help children in case of a disaster or catastrophe, however Love, hope, hugs When Scary Things Happen by Christy Monson and art by Lori Nawin is one of the best.

I enjoyed the beautiful drawings along with the message, so simple and yet powerful, of how (more…)

Mercy Rising for Readersfavorite.com

Tuesday, September 14th, 2010

The Christian way is to see other human beings as we see ourselves. This is a well-written book that inspires to do a bit more even when you think you have nothing to give. It is full of ideas and resources to help you be more generous with your blessings (more…)