Posts Tagged ‘Nancy Drew’

Quitting is never an option, but detours are part of the journey

Saturday, May 12th, 2018

Author Yolanda Renee, when did you first know you wanted to be an author?

 

I was in elementary school when I discovered my love of reading and writing, but I was in my thirties when I met my first author and became hooked on the possibility.

What makes you passionate about writing?

When a story idea hits, it unfolds like a movie in my mind. The ending is always a surprise, and the accomplishment immensely gratifying, made more so via the feedback of readers.

What was the pathway like for you to get your first book published?

After receiving hundreds of rejections, I chose self-publishing because I finally wanted to share my story with family. I only planned to print a few books, but the response from non-family was so positive I decided to try traditional publishing again. I worked hard to go the conventional route, and I achieved that goal via a small publisher. But after a dispute over royalties and the realization that self-publishing was no longer a stigma, I decided to publish my books via Y R Publishing. I enjoy being in charge of my own destiny.

Were you ever discouraged along the way? If so, how did you deal with it?

Yes, there’s were several moments when I wondered if I could write a trilogy, but I soon found that reading brought back the inspiration and drive. Quitting is never an option, but detours are part of the journey.

What books have most influenced your life?

            I was in the fourth grade when I first got a library card, I read Nancy Drew, then Judy Bolton, and from there every book I could get my hands on. Gone with the Wind is one of my all-time favorites. I have to say that romance novels, westerns, science fiction, even autobiographies have all influenced my love of reading and writing. My greatest desire is to own a bookstore or at least a massive library filled with first editions.

Please tell us about your book, Tick Tock: A Stitch In Crime & my story is Cypress, Like the Tree.

 

            Cypress, Like the Tree, is a story about the murder of a young airman. His wife is the first suspect, but Detective Cypress soon learns multiple suspects wanted the man dead.

What genre is it?

Mystery

Do you just sit down and write, waiting to see what happens next? Or do you outline first?

An idea or story usually comes to me so fast that I must write it down immediately. It’s like listening to a Dictaphone or watching a movie. The first draft is usually written in a notebook, using my own style of shorthand. Then comes the computer version. Outlines are done for my novels but only after the first draft is completed. I use one sentence descriptions of the chapters. This helps me coordinate the timelines, red-herrings, and characters.

I will admit that when I’m looking for a subject, I do steal from my life. I use the what if scenario. Cypress, Like the Tree, is one of those instances.

Who has made the greatest difference for you as a writer?

            All the authors I’ve had the pleasure reading have been an influence, but primarily Margaret Mitchell. Her determination and talent for sure, but it was also the obstacles she overcame to succeed.

But more recently, Denise Covey a writing friend from Australia, she and I host a writing challenge every other month called WEP: Write…Edit…Publish, but before I joined her, her challenges via RFW, where she and Donna Hole took the time to teach via their critiques.

I was amazed and honored when she asked me to join the team as a co-host. Denise has been an enormous influence, and now I learn from all the writers who participate.

What’s your secret to making the character’s in your books come to life?

I rely on the people I know or have met to create my characters. Their traits, looks, and idiosyncrasies all come into play, but I mix it up, so no one recognizes themselves.

Besides writing what other talents or hobbies do you have?

I’m a very organized individual, a place for everything and everything in its place. It must be so, or my muse doesn’t come out to play. I’ve also always enjoyed working with numbers (I’m a former accountant) I even enjoy doing taxes. I enjoy photography, even though my pictures are less than amateur, I keep trying.  And hiking has always been my go-to for relaxation and rejuvenation.

How do you come up with your character’s names?

I’ve used family names, and I’ve taken the names from the obituaries in the newspaper, mixing them up for something new or unusual. But I’ll steal from whatever is handy, even inanimate objects in a pinch.

What is the best compliment you could receive from a reader?

When they write, “I can’t wait for the next book!”

Where can readers go to find your books?

            Amazon Author Page

            My Blog: Defending the Pen

Tick Tock: A Stitch in Crime – Cypress, Like the Tree

            The Snowman

            Murder, Madness & Love

            Memories of Murder

            Murder & Obsession

 

Their Elvis-impersonating minister has been murder

Tuesday, April 24th, 2018
Til
Death Do Us Party
A
Liv and Di in Dixie Mystery #4
by
Vickie Fee
Genre:
Cozy Mystery
 
Las
Vegas knows how to party, and for once, event planner Liv McKay won’t
be entirely behind the scenes. The Dixie gang is in Sin City to
celebrate Mama and Earl’s rockin’ Elvis-themed wedding. And
between juggling the botched bachelorette party and a problem-plagued
soirée back home, Liv’s ready to double down on some fun. 

 

 

 

Mama
& Earl’s happily-ever-after seems like a sure thing, but all
bets (and nuptials) are off when they get to the Burning Love Wedding
Chapel. Their Elvis-impersonating minister has left the building . .
. permanently. And even worse, Liv’s cousin, Little Junior, is
suspected of his murder.

 

 

With
Mama’s happy ending on the table and Little Junior about to lose it
all, the stakes are higher than ever. Liv and her best friend, Di,
must hit the Strip to find the real killer before he finally plays
his ace…

 

 

High
energy, dead bodies and exposed lies. . . . A must read.”

 

RT
Book Reviews
,
4 Stars, on 
Death
Crashes the Party

 

 

A
wonderful cozy mystery.”

 

Suspense
Magazine 
on It’s
Your Party, Die If You Want To

 

 

Readers
should welcome this look at a very Southern lifestyle, complete with
appended party plans.”

 

Kirkus
Reviews 
on One
Fete in the Grave

 

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to Goodreads
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Vickie
Fee is a past president of the Malice in Memphis chapter of
Sisters in Crime and current member of the Wisconsin Sisters in
Crime. She has a degree in journalism and spent many years as a
newspaper reporter, covering small Southern towns populated with
colorful characters, much like those in the fictional town of Dixie.
She now lives in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula with her husband, John.
She grew up in the South on a steady diet of Nancy Drew and iced tea,
and when she’s not writing, Vickie enjoys reading mysteries and
watching B movies from the 1930s and ‘40s.
Website
* Facebook *
Twitter *
Pinterest *
Amazon
* Goodreads
 
 
Follow
the tour HERE
for exclusive excerpts and a giveaway!
 
a Rafflecopter giveaway
 
 

 

David Smith the co-author of the “Hidden Mickey” series

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

David, tell us where you were born

I was born in Southern California and grew up a mile from Disneyland

Lucky you. 🙂 What is the most difficult thing about being an author?

Learning how to be patient; Learning how to promote and market AFTER the book is written

Amen to that… Who has made the greatest difference for you as a writer?

Certainly Walt Disney from a conceptual standpoint. Reading authors such as Dean Koontz, F. Paul Wilson, Clive Cussler, Dan Brown and even the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew all helped form my desire to want to write stories.

 I learned  english with the Hardy boys and Nancy Drew. 🙂 Who or What inspired you to write this book? (more…)

Does this insecurity make me look fat? an Interview

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

 Michelle welcome to my blog. Tell us where you were born…

I was born in Provo, UT.

 That is so close to me… What is the most difficult thing about being an author?

Pre-published: Trying to get published. Post-published: Avoiding reading reviews. Lol! I’ve gotten some really great advice from other authors to not read reviews. The good ones are wonderful! But once someone that has a different opinion post it, they say it can really be difficult to swallow.

I know what you mean. Who has made the greatest difference for you as a writer?

My writing seeds were planted when I was young.  I loved L.Frank Baum, who wrote the Wizard of Oz series. Those and the original Nancy Drew series sucked me in and fed my imagination. As far as making the greatest difference as a writer, I would have to say the good women I have met, experiences I’ve had, and knowledge/skills I’ve acquired through my writer’s group American Night Writer’s Association.

I was hooked to Nancy Drew’s books. What is the name of your new book?

‘Does This Insecurity Make Me Look Fat?’

Does_This_Insecurity_detail

I love it, so cool. What genre does your book fall under?

LDS Women’s Inspirational Non-fiction

Tell us more about it.

It is a book about finding joy, peace, and confidence that comes from (more…)

“Aisha” by Denis W. Schulz a readersFavorite.com review

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Aisha has a very different style of writing, very different from what I am accustomed to; actually it is not bad. It took me a minute to understand that this phrase isn’t bad: “Fortunately the imp grew arm-weary and after a hectic minute and a half he paused to get his breath.” Cool, nicely expressed. As English is my second language, it took me a lot longer to read this story. I had to ask, Is this phrase all right? I learned that it is fine even when is not the kind of English to which I am accustomed. Imagine that! Well, you are just going to have to read it for yourself to see what I mean. (more…)