Posts Tagged ‘Gone With the Wind’

How hard can it be to tame his darker, more cynical side?

Friday, July 12th, 2019
Detour
to Paradise
by
River Ames
Genre:
Sweet Contemporary Romance 
 
Lucas
Rockworth—a hard-driving force of nature has been ordered by his
doctor to take some time off and get his blood pressure under
control. You would think buying a cabin in the natural splendor known
as Gray Horse Lake, Idaho, would do the trick. All that mountain
greenery, crystal blue lakes and rivers, and nature-run-amok had to
be exactly what the doctor had ordered.

 

 

Enter
Sarah Burke… The innocently enticing young entrepreneur who’s
opening an equestrian camp for children with handicaps.

 

 

Her
initial impression of him is clearly wrong. For some reason, known to
the reader but unknown to him, Sarah mistakenly believes that Lucas
Rockworth is a shy, sensitive man. After having to deal a lifetime
with a dominating older brother and controlling father, she finds
these traits very appealing.

 

 

Her
recent breakup with someone who could best be described as a bully
has Sarah longing for a kinder, gentler man in her life.

 

 

Lucas
tells himself that, since he makes his living as a general
contractor, he has the hands-on experience to make himself into
anything Miss Sarah Burke is looking for.

 

 

It
shouldn’t be that great a stretch to become a modern, sensitive
kind of guy, should it? She wants Mr. Rogers… Well, darn, he can
manage that for the short time he’s in Idaho.

 

 

How
hard can it be to tame his darker, more cynical side?

 

 

As
for Sarah Burke? She thinks she’s met a real life version of Mr.
Rogers. But, the reader knows its Rambo who’s come
a’courting.

 

 

Would
the real Lucas Rockworth care to step forward?

 

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River
Ames spent the first eighteen years of her life in Southern
California. Here is a partial list of some of the cities in which she
lived: Pasadena, South Pasadena, Duarte, El Monte, Arcadia La Puente,
Lomita, West Covina, Pacifica, Santa Monica, Palmdale, and Hacienda
Heights. In some of those cities, she lived at six different
addresses. In the city of La Puente, River’s family lived in four
different houses on the same street. The non-glamorous reason for all
the moves was habitual eviction necessitated for non-payment of rent.
It was an interesting way to grow up.
River
attended twenty-six different elementary schools, two different
junior high schools and four different high schools. In one
elementary school, she was a student for only three days.
Perhaps,
because she was so frequently identified as the “new girl,”
the pattern of River being an observer instead of a participant in
the interactions going on around her seemed a logical fit for her
personality.
When
she was thirteen, River read “Gone with the Wind.” She
skipped three days of school in order to finish the book in one
sitting. Disappointed in Rhett for “not giving a damn,”
River wrote her own sequel–in long hand, on three-hole punch,
notebook paper. The opening line? “Tomorrow dawned bright and
fair.” In less than fifty pages, Scarlett had been transformed
into Jane Eyre and Rhett had fallen in love with her all over again.
After
Southern California, River has spent the next part of her life living
in the semi-rural town of Idaho Falls, Idaho. She is a graduate of
Idaho State University, majoring in Health Education Sciences and
Addiction Counseling. She’s worked the past ten years at a Behavioral
Health Center where she assisted children, teenagers, and adults
committed in a 24/7 secured facility because of mental health
challenges they are experiencing.
River’s
books celebrate the good-natured humor that lays at the heart of most
of our human predicaments. The conflicts are significant, yet it is
her characters and their quirky (yet somehow universally relatable)
thoughts, words, and choices that reflect a light-hearted peek into a
world we wish was real. The amazing thing is that these worlds are
real to readers for the time they visit there.
Readers
have said: “In a River Ames book, one minute I’m laughing out
loud, and the next I have a lump in my throat.”
River
is currently readying a historical novel, “Gideon’s Justice.”
This three-part novel is Book I in a three volume western series set
in the Colorado Territory.
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Quitting is never an option, but detours are part of the journey

Saturday, May 12th, 2018

Author Yolanda Renee, when did you first know you wanted to be an author?

 

I was in elementary school when I discovered my love of reading and writing, but I was in my thirties when I met my first author and became hooked on the possibility.

What makes you passionate about writing?

When a story idea hits, it unfolds like a movie in my mind. The ending is always a surprise, and the accomplishment immensely gratifying, made more so via the feedback of readers.

What was the pathway like for you to get your first book published?

After receiving hundreds of rejections, I chose self-publishing because I finally wanted to share my story with family. I only planned to print a few books, but the response from non-family was so positive I decided to try traditional publishing again. I worked hard to go the conventional route, and I achieved that goal via a small publisher. But after a dispute over royalties and the realization that self-publishing was no longer a stigma, I decided to publish my books via Y R Publishing. I enjoy being in charge of my own destiny.

Were you ever discouraged along the way? If so, how did you deal with it?

Yes, there’s were several moments when I wondered if I could write a trilogy, but I soon found that reading brought back the inspiration and drive. Quitting is never an option, but detours are part of the journey.

What books have most influenced your life?

            I was in the fourth grade when I first got a library card, I read Nancy Drew, then Judy Bolton, and from there every book I could get my hands on. Gone with the Wind is one of my all-time favorites. I have to say that romance novels, westerns, science fiction, even autobiographies have all influenced my love of reading and writing. My greatest desire is to own a bookstore or at least a massive library filled with first editions.

Please tell us about your book, Tick Tock: A Stitch In Crime & my story is Cypress, Like the Tree.

 

            Cypress, Like the Tree, is a story about the murder of a young airman. His wife is the first suspect, but Detective Cypress soon learns multiple suspects wanted the man dead.

What genre is it?

Mystery

Do you just sit down and write, waiting to see what happens next? Or do you outline first?

An idea or story usually comes to me so fast that I must write it down immediately. It’s like listening to a Dictaphone or watching a movie. The first draft is usually written in a notebook, using my own style of shorthand. Then comes the computer version. Outlines are done for my novels but only after the first draft is completed. I use one sentence descriptions of the chapters. This helps me coordinate the timelines, red-herrings, and characters.

I will admit that when I’m looking for a subject, I do steal from my life. I use the what if scenario. Cypress, Like the Tree, is one of those instances.

Who has made the greatest difference for you as a writer?

            All the authors I’ve had the pleasure reading have been an influence, but primarily Margaret Mitchell. Her determination and talent for sure, but it was also the obstacles she overcame to succeed.

But more recently, Denise Covey a writing friend from Australia, she and I host a writing challenge every other month called WEP: Write…Edit…Publish, but before I joined her, her challenges via RFW, where she and Donna Hole took the time to teach via their critiques.

I was amazed and honored when she asked me to join the team as a co-host. Denise has been an enormous influence, and now I learn from all the writers who participate.

What’s your secret to making the character’s in your books come to life?

I rely on the people I know or have met to create my characters. Their traits, looks, and idiosyncrasies all come into play, but I mix it up, so no one recognizes themselves.

Besides writing what other talents or hobbies do you have?

I’m a very organized individual, a place for everything and everything in its place. It must be so, or my muse doesn’t come out to play. I’ve also always enjoyed working with numbers (I’m a former accountant) I even enjoy doing taxes. I enjoy photography, even though my pictures are less than amateur, I keep trying.  And hiking has always been my go-to for relaxation and rejuvenation.

How do you come up with your character’s names?

I’ve used family names, and I’ve taken the names from the obituaries in the newspaper, mixing them up for something new or unusual. But I’ll steal from whatever is handy, even inanimate objects in a pinch.

What is the best compliment you could receive from a reader?

When they write, “I can’t wait for the next book!”

Where can readers go to find your books?

            Amazon Author Page

            My Blog: Defending the Pen

Tick Tock: A Stitch in Crime – Cypress, Like the Tree

            The Snowman

            Murder, Madness & Love

            Memories of Murder

            Murder & Obsession

 

Interview, Jo Grafford, author of Breaking Ties

Saturday, February 8th, 2014

When did you first know you wanted to be an author?

I don’t remember being hit by lightening exactly, but I’ve been writing as far back as I can remember. By the fifth grade, I was writing short stories and poems and entering writing contests.

A great way to start. What makes you passionate about writing?

It’s my gift. It defines who I am. To be happy, I have to write. Like at addict needing a fix, I get all twitchy when too many hours pass without finding time to write.

Interesting… What was the pathway like for you to get your first book published?

After years of drafting partial manuscripts, it was nine months of self-imposed (more…)