Posts Tagged ‘loss’

It’s hard enough to deal with losing Sydney, but now she may lose her best friend, too

Sunday, April 15th, 2018
Seven
Days to Goodbye
A
Trina Ryan Novel #1
by
Sheri Levy
Genre:
YA Coming of Age Fiction
 
After
Trina’s beloved dog dies, she swears she’ll never get another
one. But then she learns about service dogs, and realizes that if she
becomes a puppy raiser, she could train puppy after puppy and never
worry about them dying. But like all great ideas, this one has a
serious flaw: her first service puppy must be returned to his kennel
at the end of their week-long summer vacation. And saying goodbye to
Sydney is going to be much tougher than she ever imagined.

 

 


Trina’s
last week with Sydney is made that much harder by her newly strained
friendship with her best friend, Sarah, who’s become so
over-the-top boy crazy that she’s almost like a stranger. Sarah is
determined to have them hang out with every boy at the beach, but
when a boy named Chase takes an interest in Sydney and Trina, it puts
an even bigger strain on the friendship.


 


It’s
hard enough to deal with losing Sydney, but now she may lose her best
friend, too. And even if she manages to patch things up with
Sarah—and figures out what to do about Chase—she still must face
a daunting decision: is she strong enough to take on another service
puppy?


 

“Author
Sheri S. Levy deftly taps adolescent themes of love, loss and
friendship through the added lens of a service dog’s life-changing
effects on her young trainer. A fresh twist on the familiar
coming-of-age tale. Well done!” — Jennifer Leeper, author, Padre:
The Narrowing Path

 

 

“Trina’s
foray into the world of boys, friendship, and fashion while focusing
on the important task of training service dogs strikes just the right
balance. This canine-inspired coming-of-age tale is a poignant but
fun summertime story.” — Val Muller, author, the Corgi Capers
series and The Scarred Letter

 

Goodreads
* Amazon
 

 
 
Starting
Over
A
Trina Ryan Novel #2

Trina
Ryan’s challenging summer starts off with a puppy-fueled energy
burst as she takes on another service dog for training—an
eight-week-old black Labrador named Colton. And to help explore
another dream, she’s taken a job at the barn next door in exchange
for riding lessons with the barn’s schooling horse. Before long,
Trina butts heads with Morgan Hart, an ill-tempered but skilled rider
with a gorgeous thoroughbred named Knight. 
Adding
to the list of frustrations is the difficulty in maintaining a
long-distance relationship with Chase, her first boyfriend from last
summer, while trying to deal with unwanted attention from a new boy
in her puppy training class. At least best friend Sarah still has her
back, but as Trina wearies of Morgan’s constant insults and her
heartless treatment of Knight, she decides to use her dog training
skills to look underneath Morgan’s hostile attitude and develop a
sense of trust.
Slowly,
Morgan’s angry shield cracks enough to where she’s able to share
a troubling family secret. Can Trina help Morgan confront her family
problems and make a fresh start?

“Levy
is on sure ground in this enjoyable page-turner for young adults.
Readers see the world through the eyes of Trina Ryan, a freckle-faced
redhead with a big heart for horses, service dogs, and people in
need. Trina learns some of life’s most important lessons: that
people are not always what they seem, growing up involves tough
choices, and a first crush can be more exciting than she ever
dreamed. Poignant, fun, and adventuresome.” — Peggy Jo Shaw,
award-winning journalist, PR specialist, and book
author/editor

“Starting
Over is a book you’ll want to give your daughter. A story about
best friends, boyfriends, enemies, and how to handle them all. Throw
in horses and puppies, and you have the perfect mix for an
entertaining, self-evolving read.” — C. Hope Clark, author,
Carolina Slade Mysteries and Edisto Island Mysteries

“How
do you help a friend and stay true to yourself? Trina Ryan’s
struggles to cope and regroup should ring true for teens. Most people
probably never dream so much is involved. Teens who love to read
about animals should truly enjoy Starting Over.” — Lisa Williams
Kline, author, Eleanor Hill, Princesses of Atlantis, Write Before
Your Eyes, and the Sisters in All Seasons series

“There’s
a lot going on in Trina’s life, but Levy weaves each thread
seamlessly. I especially enjoyed the detail about how to train a
service dog, as well as her experience in the barn mucking out
stalls, caring for the horses, and learning to ride. A must-read YA
novel for anyone who loves dogs and horses.” — Judy Sheluk,
author, The Hanged Man’s Noose and Skeletons in the Attic

“Dogs!
Horses! Boys! What could be better? An energetic puppy learning to be
a service dog, a sweet-tempered horse, an absentee boyfriend, and
Trina, the girl who has to make some difficult decisions about all of
them. A lovely, thoughtful coming-of-age novel.” — Ellyn Bache,
author, Kaleidoscope, The Art of Saying Goodbye, and Safe Passage

 

 

 
 
 
Sheri,
a California gal, moved to Greenville, SC, & taught special
education. Her goal was to instill the love of books. When Sheri
retired, her students had created a desire for her to write. She
joined SCBWI, & Dog Writers Association. After years of enjoying
Edisto Beach with her Aussie and Black Lab, it became the setting for
her first YA novel, Seven Days to Goodbye. 

Seven
Days to Goodbye involves a service dog connecting with a child with
autism, girls learning about the importance of friendships and trying
to keep theirs intact while flirting with guys for the first time. A
loggerhead turtle helps bring the girls together. The story has humor
and plenty of puppy love in both varieties. The second book in the
series will be, Starting Over.

 

 

 
 
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the tour HERE
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Fate is dangling before you the promise of a world that, before then, was totally out of your reach

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

 

Evy Journey, writer, wannabe artist, and flâneuse (feminine of flâneur), wishes she lives in Paris where people have perfected the art of aimless roaming. Armed with a Ph.D., she used to research and help develop mental health programs.

 

She’s a writer because beautiful prose seduces her and existential angst continues to plague her despite such preoccupations having gone out of fashion. She takes occasional refuge by invoking the spirit of Jane Austen to spin tales of love, loss, and finding one’s way-stories into which she weaves mystery or intrigue.

 

Connect with the Author here: 
~ Facebook ~ Website ~
~ Twitter ~ Facebook Group ~

Gina’s grandfather was a French chef whose life was cut short by a robber’s bullet. The only lasting legacy he could leave his family was his passion and talent for cooking.
 

 

Growing up poor but with a mother who is a gifted cook. Gina learns cooking a great meal is an act of love. An art that sustains and enhances life.
 
A world of new challenges, new friends, and new loves opens up for her when she’s chosen to cook for a Michelin-starred restaurant.
 
But danger lurks where one never expects it.
Can her passion for cooking help Gina survive and thrive in this world of privilege, pleasure and menace?

 

~ Amazon ~ Kobo ~ B&N ~ 
Snippet:

Prologue:

I’m alive. I’m dead. I’m in-between. In that limbo where my vital signs hover just above death. I rise above my body and look down on it, lying on a gurney. Hospital staff are rushing me along the brightly-lit hallway to the operating room. One of them holds an oxygen mask on my face. Another, a bag of intravenous fluid connected to my veins by a tube.
 
I’m not ready to die yet. These good people anxious to rescue me don’t know that my resolve is the only thing that is keeping me alive. No, I’m not ready to die-I’ve only just begun to live. I have yet to prove to myself, to the world, that I have what it takes to prevail.
 
My family-now on their way to the hospital-doesn’t know yet exactly what happened to me. And except for one detective, neither do the police. I see him now by the foot of the gurney, keeping pace with the nurses. He’s scowling, his lips pressed into a grim line.
 
A tall, taut, and solitary man, he has deep-set gray eyes clouded by too many images of violent death and a lower lip that hangs perpetually open in disgust or despair. So much darkness he has already seen in his thirty odd years in this world. He needs to piece together the facts that constitute the attempt on my life, events that may have led to it, and various fragments of my past to understand what brought me to this point.
The first time I met him, I fell in love with him. There was something primal about him, some paternal, animalistic instinct to save hurt or fallen victims. Like me, maybe. It gave him power and it made him irresistible to me.
 
But fate is fickle. It teases. It entices. One day, something quite ordinary happens to you. Yet, you sense that that ordinary something can change your life. Not necessarily for something better, but for something new. Fate is dangling before you the promise of a world that, before then, was totally out of your reach. How can you not seize it?
Now, of course, I see the end of that promise. And it’s not where I want to be.
It’s tragic, don’t you think, that the end of that promise should be right here on a gurney, with me fighting for my life? It certainly is not what I hoped for.
How could it end this way? I embraced life, took chances, but half-dead on this gurney, I wonder: Am I paying with my life? But, like I said. I’m not ready to die yet
 
 
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Is it possible to survive the loss of a child?

Sunday, August 13th, 2017
After the Flowers Die: A Handbook of Heartache, Hope and Healing After Losing a child by Author Melanie Delorme
“Is it possible to survive the loss of a child?

 

Even though you might be feeling that the answer to this question is no, never, absolutely not; be assured that not only is it possible for you to survive, but you are also strong enough to thrive after this devastating tragedy.
The loss of a child creates a gaping hole in a parent’s heart that seems unbearable and the only people who truly understand your pain are other bereaved parents. Melanie is one of those parents and, in After the Flowers Die, she offers encouragement, hope and honest suggestions for how you can once again experience joy. 
This book is written in an easy to read A to Z format and covers topics that many parents may experience, such as anger, bitterness, birthdays, Christmas, hope, signs, and more. If you have lost a child and are feeling hurt and lost, this book is a great starting point for you to acknowledge your loss, celebrate your child’s life and find hope.
Are you ready to begin your journey towards healing?”

 

 

~ Amazon ~ Amazon UK ~ 

~ Amazon Canada ~ Amazon Australia ~

 
 

Melanie Delorme was a content English teacher, wife, mother, sister and
friend when without warning she gained the title of bereaved parent when her
eight-year-old son Garrett was accidentally killed in a hunting accident. Her
road to healing brought her to write her first book. Melanie is involved with
her local chapter of Compassionate Friends and is passionate about offering
hope to other bereaved parents. She is currently living on a ranch in Southern
Saskatchewan with her husband, Gerry, and their two children. 




Connect with the Author here: 

~ Website ~

Excerpt

Acceptance•Addictiong ‘Anger•Annivergary•

ACCEPTANCE

I know what you might be thinking. What?! Accept this?! How dare you even suggest that Ijust accept the death of my child! Before you get angry, hear me out.

I know this is not how life is supposed to work—children should never die before their parents. My grandmother is 95 years old, and she and I had this conversation when Garrett died at age 8 and again when her son, my uncle, died at 58.

When grief experts discuss the stages of grief, acceptance often comes last. I’d like to propose that it should be first, middle, and last. The acceptance of your child’s death allows you to move through the other stages. It allows you to take ownership of your feelings and move towards healing.

It seems fitting that acceptance begins this alphabetized glossary, for without acceptance there can be no healing, no remembering, and no moving forward.

Acceptance does not mean you are over it, nor does it mean that you know how you will live with it, and it certainly does not mean that you will forget your child.

Acceptance means that, as heartbreaking as it is, you know that you cannot bring your child back. However, you will continue to search for ways to keep your child alive through positive actions and celebrations.

Acceptance is the conscious choice of realizing that your relationship with your child has not ended; it has merely changed. It has changed from physically spending time together to mentally, emotionally, and spiritually spending the rest of your life on earth together.

You will likely accept your child’s death with your head far sooner than you accept it with your heart, and that’s okay. I know my head accepted Garrett’s death a long time ago, but a few months back while setting the table for supper, I absentmindedly took five plates out of the cupboard. My heart needed a gentle reminder of our loss because it obviously wasn’t so sure about this acceptance thing.

Your heart may need some gentle reminders too. Be kind and patient with yourself as you search for this place of acceptance.

ADDICTIONS

No one sets a goal to become an addict. So often, addictions begin innocently but then slowly turn into habits that become uncontrollable.

I am not a medical professional, so perhaps I am not qualified to speak about addiction, though I am still going to offer my opinion. It has been my experience that many

addicts are trying to escape undesirable feelings. These feelings may be stress, anger, grief, or loneliness. It appears that it is not necessarily the substance or the behavior that is addictive, but more the ability to escape.

The idea that something could take away your unwanted emotions—albeit temporarily—is very tempting. Certain addictions allow us to detach from our emotions and feel carefree—briefly. Unfortunately, when the effects of the addiction wear off, our emotional pain returns, often worse than it was before.

Be mindful of your alcohol consumption, legal or illegal drug use, eating, exercising, gambling, and internet usage. If any of your behaviors start to make you feel out of control, you may want to consider seeking professional help.

ANGER

Perhaps you think that anger should be higher on the list than acceptance. Perhaps you have seen the supposed stages of grief somewhere, and you already know that anger is one of them. Possibly that is the stage you are in at this minute.

I remember seeing other parents ignore their children because they were on their phones, and I was so angry that I wanted to scream at them, How dare you not appreciate the life ofyour child. But then I remembered that I had not been a perfect parent either.

There were other times that I wanted to scream at my friends, Hello?! Have youforgotten me? How dare you get back to your normal life like nothing has changedfor you? But the reality was, nothing did change for many of them. It didn’t mean that they weren’t still thinking about me, and it didn’t mean that they would not offer support if I asked.

*See also FRIENDS

Anger is such a dangerous emotion to embrace, and even though it does not rear its head without cause, too often we forget that we have the power to control it. Every time I wanted to scream at someone, it was warranted—in my mind. However, what would it have gained me? Would it have made me feel better? Maybe for a minute. But unless it brought my son back, it would not have made me truly happy, and to be the source of another person’s hurt was not going to make me feel better.

I know a mother whose child was Idned by a reckless driver who failed to stop at a stop sign. This mother spent three years living in a state of rage. She attended every court hearing the driver faced, insisting that he be jailed for life. She wrote letters to her government officials demanding that he never receive bail, and she spoke of nothing else. The courts deemed this particular accident to be just that—an accident, and the man spent no time in jail. We can all understand her outrage, but having that man spend the rest of his life in jail was not going to take away her agony; it was not going to bring her daughter back. Furthermore, that man was also going to spend the rest of his life hurting and coping with his guilt.

Anger becomes dangerous when we choose to take this emotion with us on our daily journey. The bottom line is this: the more time you spend angry, the less time you will spend grieving and the further away it will take you from your memories and the further away you will be from acceptance.

So why isn’t anger higher on the list than acceptance? Well obviously, because my book would no longer be alphabetical. But seriously, accept that you may be angry. Allow yourself to be angry—temporarily. It will be the acceptance of your anger that will allow you to deal with it in a healthy or even practical manner. Consider taking some action to alleviate your anger. Throw something. Punch something. Scream in your car. Cry in your bedroom. Perhaps one of these will make you feel better, or perhaps you need a bigger outlet for your anger.

Have you ever heard of Candy Lightner? She was so outraged when her daughter, Cari, was killed by a drunk driver in 1980 that she organized Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD). I It doesn’t get much more practical than that! I’m not saying you need to become the founder of a new organization, but perhaps you can join an existing one or simply share your anger with others who have had similar experiences.

*See also SUPPORT GROUPS

I know it is difficult to hear and even more difficult to accomplish, but for your own wellbeing, you need to let go of anger as quickly as you can.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned.

—Buddha2

 

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Joni, Underway: all about loss, guilt, anger and a family trying to “fix you” have you been there before?

Sunday, August 23rd, 2015

 

We are so excited to feature this Brand new book from Best Selling Author Kelly Oram and her talented husband Jonathan Harrow!
 

Kelly Oram wrote her first novel at age fifteen–a  fan fiction about her favorite music group, The Backstreet Boys, for which her family and friends still tease her. She’s obsessed with reading, talks way too much, and likes to eat frosting by the spoonful.

Jonathan Harrow left a career in Hollywood to pursue his dream of writing novels. He has an author crush on Charlotte Bronte, and a real crush on his author wife, YA bestseller Kelly Oram.They live in Phoenix with their four kids and their cat, Mr. Darcy.

Connect with Kelly
Connect with Jonathan       

 

Nineteen year old Joni is loving life as an adult—living on her own, dealing with grown-up things like jobs, hook-ups, and doing her own laundry. Best of all: after finishing her first year at ASU, she will never again be called a freshman.
But when her brother is suddenly killed in a car accident, Joni’s adult life is turned upside down. Struggling to cope with loss, guilt, and anger—not to mention the meddling of friends and family trying to “fix” her—Joni is relieved to be presented with an escape in the form of a sailing trip her brother had been planning for months before he died.

(more…)

Nichole Giles Author of DESCENDANT

Saturday, March 23rd, 2013

Nichole, it is nice to meet you. Tell us what is the working title of your book?

My book Descendant is being released this coming May.
What genre does your book fall under?
It’s a young adult contemporary paranormal. Which actually is a lot of genres melded, I guess.
Which actors would you choose to play your characters in a movie rendition?

 I actually try not to pick actors for my stories, because I think the characters will look different to everyone, and I don’t want to mess up their imaginary possibilities.

I see what you mean … Do you have any advice for authors trying to break into the industry?

Never, ever, ever give up. If you can make it to the moment when you think you absolutely can’t do it anymore, that means success is just around the corner.
Also, the single most important thing you can do as a beginner is to finish a draft.
What is the synopsis of your book?
This isn’t the final cover blurb, but it’ll do:
 Seventeen-year-old Abigail Johnson is Gifted.
 
Blessed—or cursed—with Sight and Healing, Abby lives an unsettled life, moving from place to place and staying one step ahead of the darkness that hunts her. When she arrives in Jackson, Wyoming, she is desperate to maintain the illusion of normalcy, but she is plagued with visions of past lives mixed with frightening glimpses of her future. Then she meets Kye, a mysterious boy who seems so achingly familiar that Abby is drawn to him like he’s a missing piece of her own soul.
 
Before Abby can discover the reason for her feelings toward Kye, the darkness catches up to her and she is forced to flee again. But this time she’s not just running. She is fighting back with Kye at her side, and it’s not just Abby’s life at stake.
Will your book be self-published or traditional?
Traditional, through Rhemalda Publishing.
How long did it take you to write the first draft of your manuscript?
Uh…the first draft? The original first draft happened in a month. Then I threw that one away and spent the next year and a half writing it over. Five or six or seventeen drafts and six years later, it’s finally being published.
What other books would you compare this story to within your genre?
It’s actually a little like the TV show Heroes, only with teenagers.
Who or What inspired you to write this book?
A lot of people and things, actually. For this particular story, I’ve taken bits and pieces of situations and people from my whole life and meshed them all together with fictional ideas.But the idea for Abby being a healer came when I attended a workshop about chakra balancing given by a dear friend. (Find more information about holistic healing at www.thewayofthewitch.com.)
What else about your book might pique my reader’s interest?
 This story deals with loss, death, love, romance, personal healing, energetic balance, inner light, and other teenage situations.
Also, the cover will be revealed on March 4th. Anyone interested in participating in this fun event can sign up here: http://www.xpressobooktours.com/2013/02/cover-reveal-sign-up-descendant-by.html

You can find me online at www.nicholegiles.blogspot.com,https://www.facebook.com/NicholeGilesAuthor, @NicholeGiles, and Goodreads:http://www.goodreads.com/review/show/526692184

Now for an Author bio:

Nichole Giles was born in Nevada, and moved with her parents to a number of cities in and around the Midwest. Her early career plans included becoming an actress or a rock star, but she decided instead to have a family and then become a writer. Writing is her passion, but she also loves to spend time with her husband and four children, travel to tropical and exotic destinations, drive in the rain with the convertible top down, and play music at full volume so she can sing along.